IW Roundup — June 7, 2021

This Week in Irregular Warfare

Israel fears unrest in the lead up to the formation of a new coalition Government; Pakistan makes progress in combatting terrorist financing; Tribunal investigates China’s atrocities on Uighurs can amount to Genocide; Extremist attack kills 100 in Burkina Faso; and more…

Welcome to the latest installment of The Irregular Warrior’s news digest on Irregular Warfare and Special Operations. As always, we hope you’ll find this collection to be interestingly broad in its scope, in addition to bringing you the stories most relevant to U.S. readers. Now on to the roundup:

Israel fears unrest in the lead up to the formation of a new coalition Government

Israel’s Security Chief issued a warning regarding the high risk of conflict by rightist elements following key vote in order to form the coalition government. The far-right Jewish activists have planned a provocative march to further increase tensions. The new coalition government, if formed, will force Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu leave the office he has held for the last 12 years. The New York Times, June 6. [Israel Security Chief Warns Against Incitement of Conflict as Tensions Mount Before Key Vote – The New York Times (nytimes.com)]

Pakistan makes progress in combatting the terrorist financing

The Asia Pacific Group, a regional affiliate of Financial Action Task Force (FATF), issued a report indicating that Pakistan has made progress in terror financing ratings. According to the report, Pakistan has made progress in 21 parameters out of 40 and downgraded in 1. The result is that Pakistan has moved one category up in the Asia Pacific Group evaluation framework. Pakistan’s government officials believe that this and other improvements warrant keeping Pakistan off the FATF’s “blacklist.” The Hindu, June 5. [Pakistan makes progress on terror finance ratings – The Hindu]

Uighur tribunal investigates whether China’s atrocities on Uighurs can amount to Genocide

London-based people’s tribunal explores the nature of the Chinese Atrocities on Uighur minority to understand whether they can be categorized as a genocide. The tribunal is not backed by any state. It is headed by a human rights lawyer, Geoffrey Nice, and consists of other human rights activists. Some of the victims have given testimony in the initial round of investigation alleging horrendous acts including forced sterilization, forced labor, torture, and gang rape.  Al Jazeera, June 4. [‘Uyghur Tribunal’ opens with testimony of alleged rape, torture | Human Rights News | Al Jazeera]

Extremist attack kills more than hundred people in Burkina Faso

The attack took place in the village of Solhan in the Yagha province of the country. The extremist conducted the attack at night killing around 130 civilians, burned homes and markets. The responsibility of the attack has not been claimed by any group however the Sahel region of Africa including the countries of Niger, Mali and Burkina Faso have seen a series of extremist attack recently linked to AL Qaeda and Islamic State in West Africa. The Guardian, June 5. [Suspected extremist attack on Burkina Faso village kills 130 people | Burkina Faso | The Guardian]

California Sherriff warns officers not to join extremist groups — left or right

The Orange County Sherriff’s Department has been working to increase awareness among its officers regarding extremist groups. The officers have been instructed not to engage with such elements on the web or associate with militias or supremist groups. The department acknowledged the concern that officers might get drawn to such groups and disseminate racist and extremist content. While appreciating the effort, some experts have criticized the department for equating the threats posed by the “alt-right” and the “extreme left.” The Guardian, June 4. [California sheriff warns officers not to join far-right extremist groups, records reveal | US policing | The Guardian]

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